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Neanderthal Genetics May Explain Your Low Tolerance for Pain – Yahoo News

Turns out your eldest ancestors sexual antics might be the reason you’re especially sensitive to painful stimuli.

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Laser beams reflected between Earth and moon boost science – Phys.org

Dozens of times over the last decade NASA scientists have launched laser beams at a reflector the size of a paperback novel about 240,000 miles (385,000 kilometers) away from Earth. They announced today, in collaboration with their French colleagues, that the…

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Dozens of times over the last decade NASA scientists have launched laser beams at a reflector the size of a paperback novel about 240,000 miles (385,000 kilometers) away from Earth. They announced today, in collaboration with their French colleagues, that they received signal back for the first time, an encouraging result that could enhance laser experiments used to study the physics of the universe.
The reflector NASA scientists aimed for is mounted on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a…

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Starlink: SpaceX’s 100th mission may break an incredible reusability record – Inverse

SpaceX’s upcoming launch could raise the bar for reusing rockets.

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SpaceX may be about to take another step in its plan to reuse space rockets.
The company is expected to send up its 11th batch of Starlink satellites in mid-August, sending up 58 craft from Space Launch Complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The mission is also expected to send up three SkySat imagine satellites for Planet as part of a ride-sharing agreement, after the company previously hitched a ride in a Starlink mission in June. The extra satellites will be used to h…

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NASA’s InSight Mars Lander Reveals What’s Inside the Red Planet – ExtremeTech

Using the seismometer on the lander, researchers from Rice University have peeled back the layers below the surface of the red planet like a giant, dusty onion.

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Scientists believe Mars was much more similar to Earth in the distant past, not the dried-up ball of dust it is today. Understanding Mars could help us better understand how planets form, and the NASA InSight mission has the tools to get us there. Using the seismometer on the lander, researchers from Rice University have peeled back the layers below the surface of the red planet like a giant, dusty onion. 
The seismometer attached to InSight works the same as similar instruments on Earth — the …

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